Nelson | Jimmy

Home / Autoren & Fotografen / Nelson | Jimmy
Biografie Jimmy Nelson

Jimmy Nelson (Sevenoaks, Kent, 1967) started working as a photographer in 1987. Having spent 10 years at a Jesuit boarding school in the North of England, he set off on his own to traverse the length of Tibet on foot. The journey lasted a year and upon his return his unique visual diary, featuring revealing images of a previously inaccessible Tibet, was published to wide international acclaim.

Soon after, he was commissioned to cover a variety of culturally newsworthy themes, ranging from the Russian involvement in Afghanistan and the ongoing strife between India and Pakistan in Kashmir to the beginning of the war in former Yugoslavia.

In early 1994 he and his Dutch wife produced Literary Portraits of China, a 30 month project that brought them to all the hidden corners of the newly opening People’s Republic. Upon its completion the images were exhibited in the People’s Palace on Tiananmen Square, Beijing, and then followed by a worldwide tour.

From 1997 onwards Jimmy began to successfully undertake commercial advertising assignments for many of the world’s leading brands. At the same time he started accumulating images of remote and unique cultures photographed with a traditional 50-year-old plate camera. Many awards followed.

When he started to successfully and internationally exhibit and sell these images, this created the subsequent momentum and enthusiasm for the initiation of Before they Pass Away.

Video © Jimmy Nelson Pictures BV, www.jimmynelson.com, www.facebook.com/jimmy.nelson.official

Bücher

Standard Ausgabe

Kleine Ausgabe

The Project

Jimmy’s dream has always been to create awareness about our world’s indigenous cultures through his photography. He has wanted to create a visual document that shows us and future generations the beauty of how they live. Like Edward Sheriff Curtis, the famous American ethnologist and photographer, who documented the North American Indians at the beginning of last century, he wanted to create carefully orchestrated portraits of these amazing peoples, at their absolute proudest.

Since 2010, Jimmy Nelson has been travelling around the world to document some of the most iconic indigenous cultures on the planet. On his journeys, he is continuously witnessing the speed with which the amazing communities are embracing the future. He has come to realize, after a life spent travelling, that his camera is the perfect tool for making contact and building intimate and unique connections.

Jimmy Nelson is not an anthropologist or a man of science. He does not claim to have the knowledge to address the questions we have about indigenous and other traditional cultures. He is a photographer and a storyteller. What started as a naive engagement with the peoples he met during work assignments, has over a period of three decades turned into a personal project. The book ‘Before they pass away’ is an homage to the cultures he will probably never fully understand, but who will never stop luring him to explore.

His experiences on these journeys have made a lasting impression on him. There is a great humility in how he has seen wealth defined by the cultures he has met. Where Jimmy is from, they are learnt to strive for material possessions. He feels that centuries of that conception have brought the world to the brink of ecological and political disaster. Many of the peoples he has visited have a different conception of value, with lives so symbiotically and sustainably connected to their surroundings, virtually merging the two together. They provide ongoing lessons for us all.

Before They Pass Away is not meant to convey a documentary truth. The portraits in the book are Jimmy’s own artistic and creative interpretation of the people he has met. He has focused on the beauty that struck him as an outsider. He wanted to create icons. Beautiful and positive images of strong and proud people. This approach is unquestionably romantic. He hopes his esteem and admiration for the people photographed are reflected by the result.

The name chosen for this project has roused attention. ‘Before they pass away’ may give the impression that he pessimistically saw the sealed fate of those peoples he had come to meet. And maybe this is how he initially felt. But since he first published the book in 2013, his sustained and amazing interaction with the most diverse range of peoples have made him backtrack on this view. Where there are challenges, there are solutions. he has come to appreciate the pride, strength, vigour, honour and resilience of the people he asked to pose for his lense. This provides him with an unending inspiration to continue his work.

In this light, ‘before’ attains a meaning that is diametrically opposed to the fatalistic reading of doom. ‘Before’ signals a moment of opportunity, a call for action and an appeal. To decide with confidence that we value what we have and will take our support into the future.

Margaret Mead, a great social anthropologist, once said: “Having been born into a polychromatic world of cultural diversity, it is my fear that our grandchildren will awake into a monochromatic world not ever having known anything else”.

THE EXPERIENCE

“In February we visited the reindeer-herding Tsaatan peoples in the Hovsgol Province in Northern Mongolia. We had been travelling for a number of days, every day breaking camp and moving onto the next location through the thick snow and extreme low temperatures. Despite my best efforts, I was unable to get the Tsaatan families to warm to me and eventually let me direct them into making the time consuming pictures that I had come for. One evening, I finally succumbed to their daily request to essentially get blind drunk on the local vodka —the cultural norm in the northern climes to escape the daily drudgery, dark and biting cold.

After a number of hours I and twenty other adult family members fell into a self-inflicted coma onto the fur-covered floor of the newly erected teepee amongst children of varying ages. After a few hours of sleep I needed to empty my bladder.

I rolled laterally over all the bodies to the side where I wedged my body up against the skin of the teepee. It was too late. But hey, who was to know? The varying layers of outdoor clothing would soon freeze. The underside of the teepee was already frozen. The drunken reindeer herdsmen were all still snoring.

Not long after having rolled to my designated spot in the Mongolian sardine tin I soon became aware of a strange sound outside the tent. A chorus of excited grunts eventually ended up in a herd of excited reindeer trampling over the whole teepee. Little did I know that that for reindeer, human urine is a delicacy. They will actively seek it out to drink and many tribesmen carry skin containers of their own urine, which they use to attract stray reindeer back into the herd.

To my delight I found the next day that I was welcomed with open arms into the group by both young and old. And all requests to pose in front of my old cumbersome camera were granted. As it seemed that having accidentally shown my fallibility, in their eyes I was human after all. This experience was at the very beginning of the project and I subsequently soon learned that the more vulnerable I presented myself to sitters, the sooner I would could gain access to their patience and trust.”

– Jimmy Nelson –

 

About Jimmy Nelson

Jimmy Nelson (UK, 1967) started working as a photographer in 1987. Having spent 10 years at a Jesuit boarding school in the North of England, he set off on his own to traverse the length of Tibet on foot (1985). The journey lasted a year and upon his return his unique visual diary, featuring revealing images of a previously inaccessible Tibet, was published to wide international acclaim.

Soon after (1987) he was commissioned to cover a variety of culturally newsworthy themes for many of the world leading publications ranging from the Russian involvement in Afghanistan and the ongoing strife between India and Pakistan in Kashmir to the beginning of the war in former Yugoslavia. In early 1994 he and his Dutch wife Ashkaine Hora Adema produced “Literary Portraits of China”. A coffee table book about all indigenous cultures in China and their translated literature. The book was the result of a forty-month project that took them to all the hidden corners of the newly opening People’s Republic. Upon its completion, the images were exhibited in the People’s Palace on Tiananmen Square, Beijing, and then followed by a successful worldwide tour.

From 1997 onwards, Jimmy successfully undertook commercial advertising assignments for many of the world’s leading brands. At the same time he started accumulating images of remote and unique cultures photographed with a traditional

50-year-old plate camera and awards followed.

In 2010 he began his journey to create the iconic artistic document that became “Before They pass Away”. After visiting 35 chosen Indigenous communities, part 1 was published to International acclaim at the beginning of 2014. Jimmy received many awards.

Today Jimmy is still travelling and photographing to produce part 2 of the project. His communication and his passion are found on a far wider platform. He is exhibiting at International Museums, shows his work at the world’s leading Photographic Art galleries, speaking at international conferences and is at the moment setting up the Jimmy Nelson Foundation.

Pressestimmen

(…) ein eindrucksvolles Denkmal (…)

Gegen das Verschwinden. (…) Ein Prachtband, doch der Titel „Before They Pass Away“ (…) stimmt nicht hoffnungsvoll. Denn die Stämme und Völker, die Jimmy Nelson in 400 ausdrucksstarken Bildern zeigt, sind vom Untergang bedroht. Diesen Menschen, die im Einklang mit der Natur und fern der technisierten Welt leben, errichtet der britische Fotograf ein eindrucksvolles Denkmal. Seine sorgfältig arrangierten Gruppenbilder dokumentieren, welch herben Verlust menschlicher Werte das Verschwinden dieser Völker darstellen würde, sie sind der Versuch, Kultur festzuhalten, wenigstens als Erinnerung

– abenteuer und reisen, D

(…) Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen (…) Seine Fotografien (…) wollen die Augen öffnen für das kulturell „andere“. Für das, was es bald nicht mehr geben wird. (…)

Bald wird es sie vielleicht nicht mehr geben: indigene Völker, die sich ihre Traditionen bis in die Gegenwart bewahrt haben. Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen, will Erinnerungsbilder schaffen. (…) In Afrika, Papua Neuguinea und der Mongolei, in Neuseeland, Nepal, Südamerika und Indonesien oder in Pakistan hat er fotografiert – mit viel Zeit und Genauigkeit. (…) Seine Fotografien wollen in ihrer Exotik und Mystik, in ihrem Sinn für Details, für Schmuck, Tracht und Körperbemalung faszinieren, wollen die Augen öffnen für das kulturell „andere“. Für das, was es bald nicht mehr geben wird. (…)

– ARTMAPP, D

Atemberaubend (…) laut, dramatisch, voller Pathos, episch und erhaben.

(…) Bald wird es sie vielleicht nicht mehr geben: indigene Völker, die sich ihre Traditionen bis in die Gegenwart bewahrt haben. Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen, will Erinnerungsbilder schaffen. Und das tut er laut, dramatisch und zugleich erhaben. (…) „Before They Pass Away“, schon der Titel des imposanten Fotobuchs von Jimmy Nelson sagt ganz deutlich, um was es dem Fotografen hier geht. Er fotografiert Ethnien, Lebensweisen von Menschen, welche die letzten ihres Volkes sind. Ihr Wissen, ihr Leben, ihre Riten und Bräuche, all das wird es in einer zunehmend globalisierten Welt nicht mehr geben. Jimmy Nelson ist ein Bildermacher, der die große Inszenierung liebt. Seine Bilder entstehen nicht nebenbei, sind nicht lakonisch und leise, sondern: laut, dramatisch, voller Pathos, episch und erhaben. (…) Wieso dieser Hang zum Monumentalen? Vielleicht deshalb: Es wurde schon so oft leise gesprochen: über das Verschwinden von Völkern – und die zunehmende Stereotypisierung in dieser Welt. Nelsons Buch ist anders: Es ist laut, will ein deutliches Zeichen setzen. Kulturen auf der ganzen Welt hat er fotografiert. Indigene Völker, die noch im Einklang mit der Natur leben, die ihre Traditionen bewahren. Vor dem Hintergrund atemberaubenden Landschaften, in Szene gesetzt mit einer Großformatkamera auf 424 Seiten. Die letzten Ethnien – als Coffeetable-Book. (…) Mehrere Dutzend Ethnien hat Nelson fotografiert. „Ich wollte unersetzliche ethnografische Aufzeichnungen einer Welt schaffen, die bald verschwinden wird“, sagt er. „Ich hoffe, mein Projekt hilft den vom Untergang bedrohten Völkern zu überleben. Dadurch, dass es der jungen Generation in der entwickelten Welt zeigt, wie vielgestaltig die Kulturen auf der Erde noch sind. Und dass es sich lohnt, diesen Reichtum zu schützen und zu bewahren.“ (…) Es geht ihm nicht darum, wissenschaftlich präzise ethnographische Bilder zu schaffen – das haben andere schon vor ihm gemacht. Seine Bilder wollen gefallen, wollen faszinieren, wollen die Augen öffnen. Für das, was es bald nicht mehr geben wird. (…)

– www.hr-online.de, D

(…) Jimmy Nelson schafft mit seiner epochalen Serie ein Bewusstsein für die faszinierende Vielfalt der Kultur (…)

„Einzigartig“ umschreibt die von Jimmy Nelson Portraitierten in vielerlei Hinsicht am treffendsten: Derart unvergleichbar faszinierend sind die rot, gelb und weiß geschminkten Huli Wigmen aus Papua-Neuguinea, so exotisch ist der Karo-Stamm aus Äthiopien und so ergreifend das Himba-Volk in Namibia. Stammesvertreter der letzten indigenen Völker auf der Erde sind die Protagonisten der Fotografien des Künstlers Jimmy Nelson. Die Arbeiten gehen weit darüber hinaus, die vage Vorstellung der Öffentlichkeit über deren Existenz mit einem nüchternen visuellen Beleg zu bedienen. Jimmy Nelson schafft mit seiner epochalen Serie ein Bewusstsein für die faszinierende Vielfalt der Kultur- und geschichtsträchtigen Symbole dieser Völker, die Zeugenschaft über deren Riten, Bräuche und Traditionen abliefern. (…) Der positiven Irritation über die real existierende Mannigfaltigkeit der kulturellen Hervorbringungen der Erdbevölkerung wohnt zugleich ein mahnender Appell zu deren Schutz und Bewahrung inne. Neben der Befremdung wird eine Brücke geschlagen über den all diese kulturellen Artefakte einenden Ausdruck des Bemühens um Schönheit, der sich auf der Ebene der Bildkomposition und –ästhetik wiederholt und so schließlich auch den Betrachter über die ästhetische Empfindung integriert. (…) Zugleich finden sich etwa in der Weise der Positionierung der Stammesvertreter vor episch anmutenden Landschaften Ikonografien die dem Fundus des Rezeptionshorizonts der globalisierten Welt entlehnt sind. (…)

– PHOTOPRESSE, D

Schönheit, Stolz…und Würde (…) die Porträtaufnahmen wollen Geschichten von innerer Schönheit und Würde erzählen. (…)

Von Afrika bis zu den Vanuatu-Inseln: Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson war rund um den Globus unterwegs, um den Völkern dieser Welt ein Mahnmal ihrer gefährdeten Existenz zu setzen. (…) Mit dem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ zeichnet Jimmy Nelson seine dreijährige Reise in die entlegensten Winkel der Welt nach. Dabei vermied er die Rolle des beobachtenden Wissenschaftlers oder die eines Ausstellers für Kuriositäten. Vielmehr lädt er den Betrachter ein etwas über sich selbst zu lernen. (…) In dreizehn Etappen, quer über den Globus verteilt, besuchte Nelson 35 verschiedene Volksstämme. Die bisweilen menschenfeindlichen Bedingungen brachten den 46-Jährigen nah an seine Grenzen und seine 50 Jahre alte Großformatkamera erlaubte ihm wenig Spielraum. Dennoch suchte er ganz bewusst das Extrem. (…) Das unwirtliche Klima war allerdings nicht das einzige Hindernis. Ein schwer zu überwindendes Misstrauen seitens der äthiopischen Kriegerstämme – die Kalaschnikows immer präsent – verlangte viel Fingerspitzengefühl und bisweilen auch monetäre Freundschaftsbeweise. (…) Nelsons Bilder zeigen in diesen Volksgruppen mehr als nur einen idealisierten Gegenentwurf zur modernen Gesellschaft. Ebenso wenig möchte er sie auf barbarische Andersartigkeit reduzieren, die – wie es früher so häufig – nur dazu dienen soll, die Normalität des Betrachters zu bestätigen. Vor allem die Porträtaufnahmen wollen Geschichten von innerer Schönheit und Würde erzählen. (…)

– TRIP, D

atemberaubende Fotos

(…) Jimmy Nelson fängt mit seiner Kamera weltweit atemberaubende Fotos von den Lebensweisen und Bräuchen der letzten verbliebenden Völker ein, die in der globalisierten Welt versuchen, im Einklang mit der Natur zu leben. (…)

– Men’s Health Best Fashion, D

(…) große Bilder!

Die Letzten ihrer Art. Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat mit seiner Kamera Menschen porträtiert, die stolz ihre Bräuche und Kultur hüten und im Einklang mit der Natur leben, große Bilder!

– Living at Home, D

(…) Die epischen Portraits (…) entführen den zivilisierten Betrachter in eine Welt von anmutiger Rohheit (…) grandioser Bildband über die Stammeskulturen unseres Planeten (…)

Jimmy Nelsons Fotografien untergehender Kulturen…so lautet der ins Deutsche übersetzte, etwas pathetisch anmutende Titel, den der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson dem Ergebnis seines letzten Fotoprojektes gab: einem grandiosen Bildband über die Stammeskulturen unseres Planeten. Wer jetzt denkt, schon wieder so ein ödes Coffee Table Book, auf dem man beim Warten im Friseursalon seine speckigen Fingerabdrücke hinterlassen kann, der liegt falsch. Von den Mursi Äthiopiens über die Huaorani Ecuadors bis zu den Nenzen Nordsibiriens – sie alle hat Nelson vor die Linse bekommen, und sie alle wecken in uns Betrachtern ein Gefühl der stillen Überwältigung, aber auch des Verlustes und lassen uns mit diesen Empfindungen nachdenklich zurück. (…) Before They Pass Away trägt diese Aufnahmen nun zusammen und zeigt uns diese Seelen der letzten verbliebenden Eingeborenen dieser Erde. (…) Die epischen Portraits, die er mit seiner analogen Laufbodenkamera aus den Fünfzigern von indigenen Völkern aus aller Welt eingefangen hat, von Männern und Frauen, zu Tier oder Fuß, rituell bewaffnet oder bei der Arbeit, bemalt mit Körperfarben oder in Wildpelz gehüllt, differenzieren jede einzelne Kultur auf ihre ganz eigene Weise. Zugleich zeigen sie aber auch, wie ähnlich wir Menschen uns im Kern doch sind. Allen Portraits gemeinsam ist ihre Aufgabe, zu konservieren. Sie malen Erinnerungen von Lebensweisen und Künstlern fernab unseres alltäglichen Erlebnishorizontes. Sie entführen den zivilisierten Betrachter in eine Welt von anmutiger Rohheit, die in ihrer natürlichen Ursprünglichkeit so bedrückend ist, dass jeder gephotoshoppte Instagram-Schnappschuss vor Bedeutungslosigkeit in seine Bildpunkte zerfällt. Sie machen uns bewusst, wie weit die Erde bereits domestiziert ist und wie wenig an Unberührtheit noch auf unserem Planeten vorhanden ist. Und sie stimmen nachdenklich wenn sie uns Welten präsentieren, die so viel anders anmuten als die unsere und doch den Anschein erwecken, als sei unsere schnelllebige Kultur nur eine weitergezeichnete Blaupause dieser verblassenden Völker – wenn Sie insgeheim andeuten, dass auch von uns nicht mehr bleiben wird als Fußspuren im Sand, die nach und nach verwehen.

– Vangardist, AT

(…) wild, authentisch, sinnlich (…) Genießen Sie die Schönheit dieser Reise

Nichts und niemand konnte ihn aufhalten: zwei Jahre lang machte der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson die Reise seines Lebens. Der sensible Beobachter und Abenteurer scheut kein Risiko und bringt uns an Orte, Gesichter und an die Seele des Unbekannten. Man merkt, dass die Leute, die er ablichtet, an ihm genauso interessiert sind, wie er an ihnen. Man kann sehen was sie denken: wer zum Teufel ist dieser mutige, sanft entschlossene Charakter? (…) Jimmy hat keine Flinten-Kamera, sondern eine streichelnde Linse. Die Welt sollte nie vergessen, wie die Dinge sind. Um Stammeskulturen zu dokumentieren, trug Jimmy Nelson seine 4×5 Feld Kamera in 44 Länder, rund um den Globus: von den Regenwäldern Papua-Neuguineas über den Norden der Mongolei bis in die namibische Wüste. Die Kulturen könnten verschwinden, bevor wir sie kennenlernen. (…) Manchmal braucht er mehr als drei Stunden, um ein Bild aufzunehmen. Es erfordert viel Geduld. Er ist in der Tat ein Komponist der unglaublichsten Motive, ein Schöpfer sehr lebendiger Bilder. Ungefähr 31 Stammesgruppen sind dokumentiert. Sie scheinen wild, authentisch, sinnlich, aber sie zeigen deutlich die Beherrschung ihrer entlegenen und unerbittlichen Umgebung, und bieten einen Blick zurück in die Zeit, in der wir Stadtbewohner einst lebten. (…) Genießen Sie die Schönheit dieser Reise.

– ARTOLOGY, D

Das bildgewaltige Buch von Jimmy Nelson widmet sich den letzten verbliebenen Stammeskulturen rund um den Globus (…) Ein einzigartiges Buch (…)

Buch des Monats. (…) Weltreise zu den Urvölkern. (…) Bräuche, Porträts, Rituale: Ein einzigartiges Buch entführt den Leser in die hintersten Ecken der unberührten Natur – zu Menschen und Kulturen, die noch nicht von der Globalisierung überrollt wurden. Das bildgewaltige Buch von Jimmy Nelson widmet sich den letzten verbliebenen Stammeskulturen rund um den Globus. Mit „Before They Pass Away“ (…) wählt der Autor einen zutiefst pessimistischen Titel, der aufrüttelt und zum Nachdenken zwingt. (…) Seine Weltreise der Kulturen führte Jimmy Nelson in aller Herren Länder, vor allem aber zu Stämmen in Afrika, Asien, Ozeanien, Neuseeland und Südamerika, wo die meisten noch immer in ihrem natürlichen Lebensraum zu Hause sind. Zum Vorschein kommen beeindruckende Porträts von Stammesmitgliedern, die authentisch und immer würdevoll abgelichtet wurden – egal ob Mann oder Frau, egal ob Alt oder Jung. Menschen, die in Gleichmacherei an ihren uralten Werten und Traditionen festhalten, im Einklang mit der Natur leben und mit ihrer Kultur im Reinen sind. (…) Für die Aufnahmen im Buch wählte er die analoge Fotografie und machte sich mit einer seltengewordenen Großformatkamera aus den fünfziger Jahren auf den Weg. Jedes Motiv ist wohlüberlegt und bewusst entstanden, was mit einer modernen DSLR in dieser Form kaum möglich gewesen wäre. Gegen Ende des Buchs gibt Jimmy Nelson auch noch ein paar Anekdoten zum Besten (…) die zeigen, wie viel Zeit, Liebe, Herzblut und Arbeit in diesem beeindruckenden Bildband stecken.

– CHIP FOTO VIDEO, D

(…) Einzigartiger Bildband (…) einfühlsame Porträts von Menschen, die ihre kulturelle Identität selbstbewusst wahren und an künftige Generationen weitergeben wollen

Jimmy Nelsons atemberaubende Fotos von bedrohten Stammeskulturen. Sie kommen meist ohne technischen Fortschritt und die vielen Bequemlichkeiten aus, die für uns das Dasein erst erträglich machen. Ihren Alltag gestalten sie wie seit Tausenden von Jahren. Ein Leben im Einklang mit der Natur, der Glaube an die Götter, die Bewahrung kultureller Traditionen, Respekt, Liebe und Gemeinsinn sind ihr Geheimnis. Doch die letzten indigenen Völker der Erde sind in Gefahr: Ihr angestammter Lebensraum wird täglich kleiner. (…) Archiv für die Nachwelt. (…) „Ich wollte tradierte Bräuche dokumentieren, an Ritualen teilhaben und erfahren, inwiefern die Außenwelt die Lebensweise dieser Kulturen bedroht. Besonders wichtig war es mir, ästhetisch anspruchsvolle Fotografien zu machen, die auch auf lange Sicht einen dokumentarischen Wert haben. Mein Werk sollte eine rasch entschwindende Welt ethnografisch für die Nachwelt aufzeichnen.“ (…) Das ist ihm in seinem einzigartigen Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ gelungen. Seine faszinierenden Fotografien halten die Jahrhunderte alten Traditionen und Lebensweisen jener Völker fest, die in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche bewahrt haben. (…) Nach der bereits erschienenen limitierten Collector’s Edition XXL kommt im September nun auch die Standardausgabe heraus. (…) Ihm ging es ganz einfach darum, die Schönheit und Würde seiner Protagonisten zu zeigen. Behutsam hat er sich auf sie eingelassen, fand jenseits von Führern und Übersetzern eine eigene Form der Kommunikation. (…) Das bezeugen eindrucksvoll seine Bilder. Es sind einfühlsame Porträts von Menschen, die ihre kulturelle Identität selbstbewusst wahren und an künftige Generationen weitergeben wollen. Vermitteln zwischen zwei Welten. Auch die von ihm dokumentierten Stammeskulturen werden sich verändern, meint der Brite. Sie werden sich weiter entwickeln, wie sie es schon immer getan haben. Und das ist ihr gutes Recht. „Aber“, so sagt er, „vielleicht können wir ihnen ganz ohne erhobenen Zeigefinger vermitteln, welche Fehler wir bei allen vermeintlichen Segnungen des Fortschritts gemacht, was wir verloren haben und heute vermissen.“ Dazu möchte Jimmy Nelson mit „Before They Pass Away“ beitragen. Der Fotograf sieht sich als Vermittler zwischen beiden Welten. „Ich hoffe, mein Projekt hilft den vom Untergang bedrohten Völkern zu überleben. Dadurch, dass es der jungen Generation in der entwickelten Welt zeigt, wie vielgestaltig die Kulturen auf der Erde noch sind. Und dass es sich lohnt, diesen Reichtum zu schützen und zu bewahren.“

– ttt – titel thesen temperamente, D

Relikte aus der Welt

Jimmy Nelsons Bildband Before They Pass Away veranschaulicht auf bemerkenswerte Art und in Cinema-Scope-Format die verbliebenen Bräuche und Lebensweisen der Weltethnien.

WIENERIN, AT

Eine Schatztruhe für Generationen (…)

In seinem epochalen Bildband fängt Jimmy Nelson die Lebensweise der letzten verbliebenen Völker ein, die es schaffen, in der globalisierten Welt ihre Bräuche aufrechtzuerhalten. Die epischen Porträts des britischen Fotografen zeigen diese Erben jahrhundertealter Traditionen in einem stolzen Geist und in all ihrer Pracht. Ein einzigartiges visuelles Erlebnis und vor allem auch ein bedeutendes historisches Dokument. Das Buch zeigt die ganze Bandbreite menschlicher Erfahrungen und die kulturellen Ausprägungen über die Jahrhunderte. Ein Muss für jeden Fotografieliebhaber und Menschenfreund!

– WELLNESS MAGAZIN, AT

Opulenter Fotoband mit großer Tragkraft. (…) Eine brilliante Darstellung von Stammeskulturen (…) wahre Pionierarbeit (…)

Dieser außergewöhnliche Fotobildband mit einigen ausführlichen Textpassagen (…) trägt nicht nur schwer an Gewicht, sonder ist auch inhaltlich eine brilliante Darstellung von Stammeskulturen, wie es sie wohl bald vielleicht gar nicht mehr in dieser Form wird geben. Man hält quasi fast schon den Atem an, wenn man sich durch dieses Werk blättert und immer wieder auf diese unglaublichen Aufnahmen mit würdevollen Menschen und atemberaubenden Naturdarstellungen schaut. Die Betrachtung an sich ist bezaubernd und reicht von halb-/einseitigen und doppelseitigen Abbildungen bis hin zu dreiseitigen Klappaufnahmen. Jimmy Nelson schafft es vortrefflich, die Lebensweisen der letzten verbliebenen Völker einzufangen, die es noch schaffen, ihre herkömmlichen, überlieferten Bräuche zu bewahren. Die Porträts brillieren insbesondere deshalb, weil die Menschen nicht wie „in einem Zoo“ präsentiert, sondern sehr authentisch gezeigt werden. Die einfühlsamen Portraits zeigen Menschen mit ihren Bräuchen und Artefakten vor allem in Afrika, Asien, Ozeanien und Neuseeland sowie Südamerika. (…) Der Band ist sowohl für Weltreisende als auch für Fotobegeisterte ein ausgesprochen hochwertiges Material, das einen von der ersten Minute an gefangen nimmt. Jimmy Nelson hat hier wahre Pionierarbeit geleistet. Hoch Anerkennens- und empfehlenswert!!!

– www.amazon.de, D

Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen, will Erinnerungsbilder schaffen (…) dramatisch, voller Pathos, episch und erhaben (…) Die letzten Ethnien – als Coffeetable-Book

(…) Jimmy Nelson liebt die große Inszenierung. Bald wird es sie vielleicht nicht mehr geben: indigene Völker, die sich ihre Traditionen bis in die Gegenwart bewahrt haben. Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen, will Erinnerungsbilder schaffen. Jetzt ist sein Band Before They Pass Away erschienen. Schon der Titel des imposanten Fotobuches sagt ganz deutlich, um was es dem Fotografen hier geht. Er fotografiert Ethnien, Lebensweisen von Menschen, welche die letzten ihres Volkes sind. Ihr Wissen, ihr Leben, ihre Riten und Bräuche, all das wird es in einer zunehmend globalisierten Welt nicht mehr geben. Jimmy Nelson ist ein Bildermacher, der die große Inszenierung liebt. Seine Bilder entstehen nicht nebenbei, sind nicht lakonisch und leise, sondern laut, dramatisch, voller Pathos, episch und erhaben. (…) Wieso dieser Hang zum Monumentalen? Vielleicht deshalb: es wurde schon so oft leise gesprochen: über das Verschwinden von Völkern – und die zunehmenden Stereotypisierung dieser Welt. Nelsons Buch ist anders: Es ist laut, will ein deutliches Zeichen setzen. Kulturen auf der ganzen Welt hat er fotografiert. Indigene Völker, die noch im Einklang mit der Natur leben, die Ihre Traditionen bewahren. Vor dem Hintergrund atemberaubender Landschaften, in Szene gesetzt mit einer Großformatkamera auf 424 Seiten. Die letzten Ethnien – als Coffeetable-Book. (…) Er arrangiert und inszeniert seine Protagonisten. Es geht ihm nicht darum, wissenschaftlich präzise ethnographische Bilder zu schaffen – das haben andere schon vor ihm gemacht. Seine Bilder wollen gefallen, wollen faszinieren, wollen die Augen öffnen. Für das, was es bald nicht mehr geben wird.

– fotoforum, D

(…) Von den Sanddünen Namibias bis in die klirrende kalte russische Arktis führt ein epochaler Bildband zu unbekannten Kulturen dieser Erde (…)

Für die Nachwelt. Von den Sanddünen Namibias bis in die klirrende kalte russische Arktis führt ein epochaler Bildband zu unbekannten Kulturen dieser Erde. (…) Jimmy Nelson (…) stellt in einem gigantischen Bildband das Kontrastprogramm dar: auf 424 Seiten zeigt Before They Pass Away Menschen und Alltag unbekannter Stämme rund um den Globus. Nelson begann seine Karriere im zarten Alter von 19 Jahren, als er auf einem einjährigen Trip durch Tibet Bilder schoss. Fortan führten ihn seine Fotoreisen bis in die entlegensten Winkel der Erde, dabei auch in Kriegsgebiete wie Somalia und das ehemalige Jugoslawien. Sein großformatiges Meisterwerk basiert auf einem Projekt, das 44 Länder umspannt, und liest sich wie eine Liebeserklärung an 29 der letzten Stammeskulturen auf unserem Planeten. (…) Digitales Gerät und aufwändige Belichtungstechnik ließ der Fotograf beiseite und reiste stattdessen mit einer Laufboden-Großformatkamera. Die Arbeiten zogen sich so zwar in die Länge, ermöglichten es Nelson jedoch auch, seine Fotomodelle besser kennenzulernen. Sein Plan ist es, zu den Stämmen zurückzukehren und ihnen nicht nur das Buch zu bringen, sondern auch Nützliches im Wert von zehn Prozent des Verkaufserlöses. (…)

– DEPARTURES, D

(…) Ein wahrer Meilenstein der Fotoreportage und ein absolutes Muss für alle Freunde wirklich großer und sinnstiftender Fotografie (…) Noch nie wurde dieses faszinierende und in all seiner Tiefe ausgesprochen berührende Thema eindringlicher und purer eingefangen (…)

Im Mittelpunkt dieses historisch bedeutsamen Bandes stehen Stammeskulturen aus aller Welt. Gerade in Zeiten der Globalisierung können diese Gesellschaften wegen ihrer charakteristischen Lebensweisen, Künste und Traditionen nicht hoch genug geschätzt werden. (…) Jimmy Nelson beschenkt uns nicht nur mit atemberaubenden Bildern von Bräuchen und Artefakten, sondern auch mit einfühlsamen Porträts von Menschen, die zu Hütern einer Kultur geworden sind, vor der sie – und wir – hoffen, dass sie in all ihrer Pracht auch an künftige Generationen weitergegeben wird. Mit seiner Laufboden-Großformatkamera fängt Nelson jedes noch so feine Detail und jede winzige Nuance für die Nachwelt ein und präsentiert zahlreiche Szenen dieses prächtigen Schauspiels vor den lebendigen Hintergründen der noch unberührtesten Landschaften unseres Planeten. Noch nie wurde dieses faszinierende und in all seiner Tiefe ausgesprochen berührende Thema eindringlicher und purer eingefangen. Ein wahrer Meilenstein der Fotoreportage und ein absolutes Muss für alle Freunde wirklich großer und sinnstiftender Fotografie. (…) In seinem epochalem Bildband Before They Pass Away fängt Jimmy Nelson die Lebensweise der letzten verbliebenen Völker ein, denen es gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche aufrechtzuerhalten. Die Epischen Porträts des britischen Fotografen zeigen diese würdevollen Erben jahrhundertealter Traditionen in einem stolzen Geist und in all ihrer Pracht. Dieser Rundumblick auf die Stammeskulturen der Welt ist ein einzigartiges visuelles Erlebnis und vor allem auch ein bedeutendes historisches Dokument.

– AQ Art Quarterly, AT

Einzigartig

In seinem epochalen Bildband fängt Jimmy Nelson die Lebensweisen der letzten verbliebenen Völker ein, denen es gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre Bräuche aufrechtzuerhalten.

– COVER, AT/D

Save the World!

Die letzten verbliebenen Völker, denen es gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche aufrechtzuerhalten, hat der englische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson besucht und ihre Kulturen, ihre Lebensweisen und ihre Traditionen dokumentiert. Das Ergebnis dieser Arbeit ist dieser epochale Bildband.

– Skylines, AT

(…) epochaler Bildband (…)

Visueller Widerspruch, der nachdenklich stimmt: In seinem epochalem Bildband (…) porträtiert der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson Vertreter der letzten indigenen Völker in Hochglanz-Ästhetik und bereiste dafür den gesamten Globus – von Afrika bis zu den Vanuatu-Inseln.

– BILD am Sonntag, D

Für die Ewigkeit (…)

Geht es um Tradition, ist häufig das höchste der Gefühle, die Weihnachtsfeiertage für die Familie zu blocken. Jimmy Nelson hingegen fotografierte für seinen faszinierenden Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ (…) Völker, die noch völlig in ihren Traditionen leben. (…)

– Die Stilisten, D

Bilder der letzten Ureinwohner dieser Welt (… ) in atemberaubenden Fotos porträtiert (…)

Sie leben im Einklang mit der Natur, hegen jahrhundertealte Bräuche – und leben abseits jeglicher Zivilisation und Globalisierung. Der englische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat in seinem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ die letzten Stammeskulturen dieser Welt in atemberaubenden Fotos porträtiert. Das Buch zeigt Völker, denen es noch immer gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche und alten Traditionen aufrechtzuerhalten. Jimmy Nelson hat dafür in mehr als zwei Jahren 31 indigene Völker auf der ganzen Welt besucht, sich ihre Welt zeigen lassen und sie anschließend abgelichtet. (…) Nelson will damit diese vom Aussterben bedrohten Kulturen ethnographisch für die Nachwelt aufzeichnen. (…)

– www.diepresse.com, AT

(…) Vergängliche Schönheit (…) Jimmy Nelson will (…) bedrohten Naturvölkern mit seinem Buch ein Denkmal setzen (…) einzigartige Dokumente ihrer Würde.

Zwei Jahre reiste der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson um die Welt zu den letzten Naturvölkern. Seine Bilder sind einzigartige Dokumente ihrer Würde. (…) der Fotograf schießt (…) das Bild seines Lebens – eine von Hunderten Aufnahmen aus dem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ (…) Eines von vielen Zeugnissen, die eine Welt bewahren, die im Begriff ist unterzugehen. Der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson will ein Vermittler sein zwischen den Urvölkern und der Zivilisation. Er will sie so zeigen, wie er sie erlebt hat – voller Würde und Stolz. (…) Wer Nelsons Werk nur als eine Sammlung folkloristischer Fotos betrachtet, hat ihn nicht verstanden. Ihm geht es um Identität. (…) Er sucht nach Völkern, die sich ihre Kultur bewahrt haben. Die vollkommen unabhängig von den Einflüssen der Zivilisation und der Globalisierung leben. (…) Er will nicht einfach nur Schnappschüsse mit nach Hause bringen, er will seine Protagonisten in Szene setzen wie ein Regisseur. Er bringt die mongolischen Jäger dazu, immer wieder aufs Neue auf den Berg zu reiten. Er überzeugt Angehörige äthiopischer Stämme mit Gesten und Worten, ihren Festtagsschmuck anzulegen. Er komponiert Bilder, die wie Gemälde alter Meister wirken. (…) Jimmy Nelson will all diesen bedrohten Naturvölkern mit seinem Buch ein Denkmal setzen. Und er will Ihnen etwas zurück geben. Er plant, noch einmal zu einigen der Stämme zu reisen und ihnen die Fotos zu zeigen. Außerdem möchte er seine Dokumentation über weitere Völker fortsetzen. Die Leser seines Buches fordert er derweil auf, das zu tun, was er mit den fremden Stämmen getan hat: Fotografiert euch und euer Leben! (…)

– HÖRZU, D

Stolze Seelen. Ein neuer Bildband (…) lässt tief in die Kultur der letzten Stammesvölker dieser Erde blicken.

Fast so stolz und erhaben wie ihre Steinadler wirken die Kasachen, die schon seit über zwei Jahrtausenden den Beutetieren in den Gebirgen und Steppen der Mongolei nachstellen. Wenn sie zu Pferd über die gigantischen Eisplatten der westlichen Provinz Bajan-Ölgii ziehen, bieten sie einen Anblick, der an Imposanz kaum zu übertreffen ist. Diesen und mehr einmalige Momente hat Jimmy Nelson mit seiner Kamera festgehalten und sie damit auch noch für zukünftige Generationen greifbar gemacht. In seinem epochalem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ präsentiert der britische Fotograf und der Verlag teNeues die Schönheit der Stammeskulturen dieser Welt. Auf 424 Seiten porträtiert er den stolzen Geist, die authentische Pracht und die viel zu vergängliche Individualität der letzten verbliebenen indigenen Völker. (…) Jimmy Nelson startet mit dem visuell eindrucksvollen Bildband den Versuch, die Einzigartigkeit dieser Menschen für jetzt und für die Nachwelt zu bewahren. (…) Positioniert vor den lebendigen Hintergründen unberührter, nahezu unglaublicher Landschaften vereinen sich Mensch und Natur zu einem großartigen Gesamtkunstwerk.

– www.reiseaktuell.de, D

(…) Monumental, authentisch. Episch, fantastisch, grandios!

„…nur noch kurz die Welt retten…“ (…) Vergänglichkeit. Nähe, Respekt, Verständnis, Vertrauen und Einfühlsamkeit, Ehrlichkeit, Konzentration und Instinkt sind die Grundvoraussetzungen, um intensive Kontakte zu fremden Völkern knüpfen und ihre Kultur authentisch einfangen zu können, resümiert Fotograf Jimmy Nelson angesichts der Präsentation seines monumentalen Bildbandes „Before They Pass Way“. Vor mehr als einem Vierteljahrhundert, im Alter von achtzehn Jahren, unternahm der aus England Stammende seine erste große Expedition, die ihn nach Tibet führte. (…) Ein Dezennium als Reporter, gefolgt von einem als Werbefotograf, ließ ihn aber einen juvenilen Traum nicht vergessen. Nämlich eine Erdumrundung zu unternehmen, um Reichtum und Vielfalt des Planeten und seiner Menschen kennenzulernen und dokumentierend für die Nachwelt zu erhalten. Mithilfe eines Mäzens umrundete er schließlich 30 Monate lang den Globus, besuchte und dokumentierte 31 weitgehend autark lebende indigene Völker. Das Ergebnis ist ein einfühlsames Dokument oft unbekannter Stammeskulturen von allen Kontinenten. Mit ethnischen Bräuchen und Artefakten. Stets im Einklang mit der Natur. Monumental, authentisch. Episch, fantastisch, grandios!

– Der STANDARD, AT

5 Kilo Kultur (…) Rundumblick auf die Stammeskulturen der Welt (…)

5 Kilo Kultur. In seinem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ fängt Jimmy Nelson die Lebensweise der letzten Völker ein, denen es noch gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche aufrechtzuerhalten. Nelson zeigt würdevolle Erben jahrhundertealter Traditionen in einem stolzen Geist. Dieser Rundumblick auf die Stammeskulturen der Welt ist nicht nur visuell spannend, sondern vor allem auch ein bedeutendes historisches Dokument. Im Mittelpunkt des Bandes stehen Stammeskulturen aus aller Welt. Ihre Mitglieder sind Hüter einer Kultur, von der sie hoffen, dass sie in all ihrer Pracht auch an künftige Generationen weitergegeben wird. Mit seiner Laufboden-Großformatkamera fängt Nelson jedes noch so feine Detail und jede winzige Nuance für die Nachwelt ein und präsentiert zahlreiche Szenen dieses prächtigen Schauspiels vor den lebendigen Hintergründen der unberührtesten Landschaften unseres Planeten. Falls die Kulturen die Zeit nicht überleben – das unhandliche 5-Kilo-Fotobuch hat beste Chancen zu überdauern.

– DOCMA, D

(…) Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen (…) dramatisch, voller Pathos, episch und erhaben (…)

Bald wird es sie vielleicht nicht mehr geben: indigene Völker, die sich ihre Traditionen bis in die Gegenwart bewahrt haben. Jimmy Nelson fotografiert gegen das Vergessen, will Erinnerungsbilder schaffen (…) Before They Pass Away, schon der Titel (…) sagt ganz deutlich, um was es dem Fotografen geht. Er fotografiert Ethnien, Lebensweisen von Menschen, welche die letzten ihres Volkes sind. Ihr Wissen, ihr Leben, ihre Riten und Bräuche, all das wird es in einer zunehmend globalisierten Welt nicht mehr geben. Jimmy Nelson ist ein Bildermacher, der die große Inszenierung liebt. Seine Bilder macht er nicht nebenbei – sie sind alles andere als nüchtern. Stattdessen: dramatisch, voller Pathos, episch und erhaben. Er hat einen Hang zum Monumentalen. Seine Fotografie will ein deutliches Zeichen setzen, will in ihrer Schönheit auffallen. Kulturen auf der ganzen Welt, mehrere Dutzend Völker hat er fotografiert. Vor dem Hintergrund atemberaubender Landschaften, in Szene gesetzt mit einer Großformatkamera. Er zeigt stolze Menschen in herausfordernden Portraits. (…)

– fotoforum, D

(…) fantastisch, berührend und sehr schön (…)

Einblick in die Welt. Die letzten Stammesvölker der Erde werden in dem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ eindrucksvoll porträtiert. Jimmy Nelsons Fotos sind fantastisch, berührend und sehr schön.

– FRAU IM SPIEGEL, D

Das preisgekrönte Meisterwerk ist eine Hommage an die Stammeskulturen unserer Erde, eingefangen von der Linse des Starfotografen Jimmy Nelson. (…)

– H.O.M.E, D

Ein Geschichtsbuch, das gleichzeitig ein Weckruf ist: Schützt sie!

Die letzten ihrer Art. Der Brite Jimmy Nelson hat die letzten Eingeborenenstämme porträtiert. Ein Geschichtsbuch, das gleichzeitig ein Weckruf ist: Schützt sie! „Bevor They Pass Away“ (…)

– COSMOPOLITAN, D

(…) einer der besten Fotografen der Welt (…)

– Markus Lanz im ZDF, D

(…) Diese Hommage an die kraftvollen Stammeskulturen rund um den Globus ist ein Muss für jeden Fotografie-Liebhaber. (…)

– BuchMarkt, D

Ein epochaler Bildband (…) Wunderschöne Bilder, traurige Botschaft (…)

(…) Es war EINMAL. Ein epochaler Bildband porträtiert die letzten Urvölker dieser Erde. Wunderschöne Bilder, traurige Botschaft: Der britische Reisefotograf Jimmy Nelson zeigt in „Before They Pass Away“ die Lebensweise der letzten verbliebenen Völker, die es trotz globalisierter Welt noch schaffen, ihre Bräuche zu bewahren. (…)

– COVER, D

Hüter der Kulturen (…) ein bewegendes Archiv der Völker

Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hatte eine Mission: Menschen porträtieren, die der Zivilisation trotzen – bevor ihre Tradition ausstirbt. Entstanden ist ein bewegendes Archiv der Völker.

– P. M. History, D

Kulturerbe (…) Für den Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ besuchte der Brite Jimmy Nelson 31 Urvölker von der Mongolei bis Papua Neuguinea. Die Bräuche und Rituale der Stämme, die in völliger Abgeschiedenheit leben, dokumentierte er in opulenten Bildern.

– Mercedes-Benz Magazin, D

(…) Und zur Jagd geht’s mit dem Adler (…)

Asiatisches Gebirge oder afrikanische Wüste: Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson reiste in entlegene Ecken der Welt, um die letzten Menschen zu fotografieren, die noch in Stammesgemeinschaften leben. (…)

– www.stern.de, D

(…) Dieser Bildband ist fraglos einer der ästhetischsten und damit kontroversesten des Bücherjahres 2013 (…) ein visuelles Schwergewicht (…)

(…) Jetzt hat sich ein Fotograf aufgemacht, die letzten Stämme dieser Welt zu besuchen. Indigene Völker von Afrika bis zu den Vanuatu-Inseln. Und nicht nur besuchen wollte er sie, um sich in ihr Leben und Denken zu versenken. Stille Einkehr wäre zu wenig – zu wenig für den britischen Werbefotografen und Kampagnenführer internationaler Konzerne, für Jimmy Nelson. Der schulterte seine alte Großformatkamera, bereiste 31 Stämme und fotografierte sie. Und zwar mit Ambitionen, ihnen ein Denkmal zu setzen. Diese Ehrenmäler nun liegen versammelt als Buch vor. (…) Es ist ein coffee-table-book, es ist ein visuelles Schwergewicht. Dieser Bildband ist fraglos einer der ästhetischsten und damit kontroversesten des Bücherjahres 2013. (…) Reinheit wird da behauptet, Ehre propagiert und ihre Vertreter als letzte Bastionen unverfälschter Natürlichkeit. Natürlich ist das ansprechend. Nelsons Manifest ist so betörend, dass es das perfekte Weihnachtsgeschenk ist. (…)

– Die Weltwoche, CH

Die Letzten ihrer Art (…)

Das Erbe Winnetou? Der Bildband von Jimmy Nelson präsentiert Kulturen rund um den Globus, die wohl bald verschwinden. Er lässt alles offen: sich vorbehaltlos an den farbenprächtigen Menschen zu erfreuen, für den Erhalt des Regenwaldes zu kämpfen oder die europäischen Mythen vom „echten Wilden“ weiterzuspinnen. (…) In deutscher, englischer und französischer Sprache stellen kurze Texte die jeweilige Ethnie vor. So kann man sich etwa über Glauben und Ernährung informieren. Die nachfolgenden Bilder illustrieren alles stimmungsvoll. Einerseits ist ihre Wirkung der Inszenierung zu verdanken, die die Menschen in schönstem Licht zeigen. Für die sorgfältige Komposition schleppte Nelson sogar eine Großformatkamera über Berg und Tal. (…) Der Bildband beeindruckt allein durch seine Maße. Er ist 29 mal 37 mal 5,5 Zentimeter groß und entsprechend schwer. In ihm sind immerhin Fotos von 24 Völkern enthalten. Klugerweise wählte sie Nelson nicht nach angeblicher „Naturbelassenheit“ aus. Vielmehr nahm er Tibeter, Gauchos und Maori auf, deren besondere Lebensweise ebenso verschwindet wie die von Hauorani -Indianern. (…)

– fotoHITS, D

(…) Seine Fotos öffnen die Augen und die Herzen des Betrachters.

Archiv der Menschheit. Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson ist zwei Jahre lang rund um den Globus gereist, um Stämme zu besuchen, die in großer Abgeschiedenheit leben. Seine faszinierenden Bilder dokumentieren deren jahrhundertealte, vom Untergang bedrohte Traditionen. Sie leben im Einklang mit der Natur, sie glauben an die Macht der Götter, sie pflegen ihre uralten Bräuche und Riten. Gemeinsinn und gegenseitiger Respekt prägen ihren Alltag. (…) Nelson lebte bei den Stämmen in Neuseeland, Nepal, Südamerika und Indonesien, in Afrika, Papua-Neuguinea und der Mongolei, in Pakistan und auf den Vanuatu-Inseln. (…) Da er ohne Übersetzter unterwegs war, musste er sich mit Händen und Füßen verständigen, manchmal auch durch Singen, Tanzen oder Schreien. (…) Eine Auswahl von Nelsons besten Fotos ist jetzt in einem faszinierenden Bildband erschienen. (…) Eines hat er schon jetzt erreicht: Seine Fotos öffnen die Augen und die Herzen des Betrachters.

– Lufthansa Magazin, D

(…) fasziniert in Wort und Bild (…)

Jetztzeit im Bild. (…) Wenn zur Ankündigung eines Buches Begriffe wie epochal und einzigartig verwendet werden, schraubt das die Erwartungshaltung des potenziellen Lesers durchaus in die Höhe. Jimmy Nelson verzichtet auf britische Zurückhaltung und wagt mit seinem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ diesen Höhenflug. Mit gutem Grund: Das Ergebnis leistet mit allen Mitteln Überzeugungsarbeit und fasziniert in Wort und Bild. Der Topfotograf präsentiert in diesem 424 Seiten starken Werk das Ergebnis seiner Reisen zu eindrucksvollen Stammeskulturen dieser Welt. In Zeiten der Globalisierung hat er mit seiner Laufboden-Großformatkamera Gesellschaften im Fokus, die ihr Erbe jahrhundertealter Traditionen prachtvoll und stolz pflegen. Noch so feine Details dieser Lebensweisen, Künste und Traditionen wurden bildgewaltig für die Nachwelt eingefangen. Einfühlsame Texte komplettieren das visuelle Erlebnis.

– Diners Club Magazin, AT

Jimmy Nelson beschenkt uns nicht nur mit atemberaubenden Bildern von Bräuchen und Artefakten, sondern auch mit einfühlsamen Porträts von Menschen, die zu Hütern einer Kultur geworden sind (…)

Im Mittelpunkt dieses historisch bedeutsamen Bandes stehen Stammeskulturen aus aller Welt. Gerade in Zeiten der Globalisierung können diese Gesellschaften wegen Ihrer charakteristischen Lebensweisen, Künste und Traditionen nicht hoch genug geschätzt werden. Ihre Mitglieder leben im Einklang mit der Natur, was in unserem modernen Zeitalter zur Seltenheit geworden ist. Jimmy Nelson beschenkt uns nicht nur mit atemberaubenden Bildern von Bräuchen und Artefakten, sondern auch mit einfühlsamen Porträts von Menschen, die zu Hütern einer Kultur geworden sind, von der sie – und wir – hoffen, dass sie in all ihrer Pracht auch an künftige Generationen weitergegeben wird. Mit seiner Laufboden-Großformatkamera fängt Nelson jedes noch so feine Detail und jede winzige Nuance für die Nachwelt ein und präsentiert zahlreiche Szenen dieses prächtigen Schauspiels vor den lebendigen Hintergründen der noch unberührtesten Landschaften unseres Planeten. (…)

– The Black Journal, AT

Würdigung der kraftvollen Stammeskulturen auf der Welt

Im Zentrum dieses historisch bedeutsamen Bildbandes des britischen Fotografen Jimmy Nelson stehen verschiedene Stammeskulturen aus aller Welt. Anhand von epischen Porträts dokumentiert er, wie es diesen Völkern gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche aufrechtzuhalten. (…) Damit gemeint sind unter anderem das Volk der Nenzen, das in Russland beheimatet ist, die in Namibia ansässigen Himba sowie die neuseeländischen Maori. (…) Ein visuelles Dokument zu schaffen, dass die Menschen dieser und künftiger Generationen daran erinnert, wie schön die menschliche Welt einmal war, ist ihm ein wichtiges Anliegen, erfährt man auf der Homepage des Fotografen. „Before They Pass Away“ vereint atemberaubende Bilder von Bräuchen und Artefakten mit einfühlsamen Porträts von Menschen, die zu Hütern einer Kultur geworden sind. (…) Warum wir dieses Buch empfehlen: Weil es eine ästhetisch, intellektuelle und emotional fesselnde Würdigung der kraftvollen Stammeskulturen auf des Welt ist.

– COLORFOTO fotocommunity MAGAZIN, D

Die Stämme sterben aus. (…) Der englische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat 31 von der Vernichtung bedrohte Völker in großartigen Aufnahmen porträtiert. (…)

Ein Buch für den Küchentisch. Es wiegt, wenn ich meiner Waage trauen darf, 5 400 Gramm, ist 29 mal 37 Zentimeter groß und hat 424 Seiten. Ein Brocken von einem Bildband. Der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat Jahre lang Stammeskulturen überall auf der Welt besucht. Er hat sie fotografiert: die Menschen, ihre Tiere, ihre Hütten, ihre Landschaften. Er hat all das fotografiert mit einem Aufwand, mit einem Blick für das Ästhetische, wie sonst nur die Kreationen der Modeschöpfer und ihre Modelle bekommen. (…) Jimmy Nelson hat alles unternommen, um die Menschen, die Landschaften schön erscheinen zu lassen. Aber gerade dadurch wird deutlich, auf welch verschiedene Weisen sie es sind. (…) Jimmy Nelson weiß, er könnte der Letzte sein, der zum Beispiel die äthiopischen Mursi, die arktischen Tschuktschen, die Huli in Papua-Neuguinea, die Huaorani in Ecuador oder die Dani in Indonesien so hat fotografieren zu können. (…)

– Berliner Zeitung, D

EPOS. Ein bildgewaltiges Coffeetable Book, das die letzten Ethnien porträtiert, die ihren Stammesbräuchen noch treu geblieben sind. (…)

– VOGUE, D

(…) eines der Fotobuch-Highlights des Jahres 2014 – ein Meisterwerk der Fotokunst (…)

(…) Mit seiner Großformat-Kamera reiste Jimmy Nelson um die Welt und porträtierte die Stämme unserer Erde in atemberaubenden Fotos. Das riesige Buch mit dem Titel „Before They Pass Away“ war eines der Fotobuch-Highlights des Jahres 2014 – ein Meisterwerk der Fotokunst. (…)

– www.digitalphoto.de, D

Emotionale Fotografien für die Nachwelt (…)

(…) Ein epochaler Bildband. Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson ist rund um den Globus gereist und hat sie besucht: die letzten indigenen Völker der Erde. Besonders wichtig war ihm dabei eine ästhetisch anspruchsvolle Fotografie, die auf lange Sicht einen dokumentarischen Wert besitzt. Das ist ihm mit seinem einzigartigen Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ gelungen. (…)

– SCHWEIZER ILLUSTRIERTE, CH

(…) Die Vielfalt unseres Planeten wurde selten so schön dargestellt (…)

Stämme der Welt. Fünf Sterne reichen nicht aus, um den faszinierenden Bildband von Jimmy Nelson zu bewerten. Mit seiner Großformat-Kamera reiste er einmal um die Welt und porträtierte die Stämme dieser Erde in atemberaubenden Aufnahmen. Die Vielfalt unseres Planeten wurde selten so schön dargestellt wie in diesem zugegebener Maßen, recht teuren Buch. Wer das Geld ausgibt, erhält ein wahres Kunstwerk!

– Digital photo, D

(…) eine Bereicherung im Bücherregal für jeden Reise- und Fotografieliebhaber.

Jimmy Nelson widmet sein Werk aussterbenden Völkern und ihren Kulturen. (…) Zum Nachdenken. Mit „Before They Pass Away“ setzt der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson jenen Völkern ein Denkmal, die inmitten einer globalisierten Welt an ihren überlieferten Bräuchen festhalten. Dafür reiste Nelson nach Äthiopien, Tansania und Kenia, nach China und Nepal oder auch nach Sibirien und durch die Mongolei. Der kulturelle Reichtum der indigenen Bevölkerung dieser Länder differenziert sich bei jedem einzelnen Stamm auf jeweils eigene Weise neu und sieht anders aus. (…) Before They Pass Away is eine Hommage an die kraftvollen Stammeskulturen dieser Erde und eine Bereicherung im Bücherregal für jeden Reise- und Fotografieliebhaber.

– Diva, AT

Bemalte Seelen in der Wildnis

Archiv für die Nachwelt. Fotograf Jimmy Nelson reiste drei Jahre um den Globus und hielt das Leben vom Aussterben bedrohter Kulturen mit einer 5×4-Zoll-Laufboden-Kamera fest. In einem außergewöhnlichen Bildband präsentiert er jetzt seine Sicht auf die Bewohner einer archaischen Welt, die sich aufzulösen droht. (…) Er habe Menschen fotografiert, die noch nie in ihrem Leben ein Foto von sich gesehen hatten, sagte Nelson. (…) Angst vor Gefahren und ums eigene Leben habe er nie gehabt, auch nicht in Papua-Neuguinea bei den kannibalisch-traditionierten Stämmen. (…) Sprachprobleme gab es nie. Man verstand sich durch Gestik, Mimik, durch singen, lachen oder tanzen. (…) Mit dem Buch wird er bald zu ihnen zurückkehren, den bemalten Seelen in der Wildnis dieser Welt, und ihnen die Bilder ihres Lebens zeigen. (…)

– ärztliches journal, D

(…) Zeitreise (…) Nelson ist rund um die Erde gereist, um den letzten Vertretern indigener Kulturen ein fotografisch ästhetisches Denkmal und gleichzeitig der Öffentlichkeit ein Mahnmal von deren gefährdeter Existenz zu setzen (…)

Zeitreise. Sie leben gänzlich ohne technischen Fortschritt und ohne Komfort der modernen Welt. Stattdessen prägt der Glaube an Götter, tiefe Naturverbundenheit, Riten und Traditionen die Kulturen indigener Stammesvölker. Vertreter der letzten und bedrohten Urvölker unserer Erde sind die Protagonisten der Fotografien des britischen Künstlers Jimmy Nelson. (…) Nelson ist rund um die Erde gereist, um den letzten Vertretern indigener Kulturen ein fotografisch ästhetisches Denkmal und gleichzeitig der Öffentlichkeit ein Mahnmal von deren gefährdeter Existenz zu setzen. Dabei ging der Fotograf weit darüber hinaus, lediglich einen visuellen Beleg über Ihre Existenz zu liefern. (…) Dabei folgte Nelson keinem wissenschaftlichen Ansatz, sondern dem Wunsch, Anmut, Schönheit und Kreativität seiner Motive zu dokumentieren. (…)

– Color Foto, D

(…) Jedes einzelne Bild seiner faszinierenden Serie ist ein wahres Kunstwerk.

Völker dieser Erde. Dort, wo in unseren Augen die Zivilisation aufhört, begann Jimmy Nelson zu fotografieren. Seine Bilder zeigen indigene Völker wie die Maori in Neuseeland. Einmal um die Welt reiste der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson und portätierte Eingeborene und Stämme dieser Erde in atemberaubenden Aufnahmen. Die Vielfalt unseres Planeten wurden selten so schön dargestellt: Stammesvertreter aus Papua-Neuguinea, Massai in Tansania, Tibeter oder die Maori Neuseelands – Nelsons epochale Serie mit dem Titel „Before They Pass Away“ zeigt eine fast vergessene Welt: Menschen, die so gar nicht in unsere hochzivilisierte Zeit passen wollen und auch deswegen mehr denn je um ihr Überleben fürchten zu müssen. Die entstandenen Portäts zeigen Völker, die im Einklang mit der Natur leben, weit ab von Hightech und Globalisierung. Jedes einzelne Bild seiner faszinierenden Serie ist ein wahres Kunstwerk.

– FOTOEASY, D

(…) Ein Brocken von einem Bildband (…)

Die Stämme sterben aus. (…) Der englische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat einunddreißig von der Vernichtung bedrohte Völker in großartigen Aufnahmen porträtiert. (…) Ein Buch für den Küchentisch. Es wiegt, wenn ich meiner Waage trauen darf, 5400 Gramm, ist 29 mal 37 Zentimeter groß und hat 424 Seiten. Ein Brocken von einem Bildband. Der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat jahrelang Stammeskulturen überall auf der Welt besucht. Er hat sie fotografiert: die Menschen, ihre Tiere, ihre Hütten, ihre Landschaften. Er hat all das fotografiert mit einem Aufwand, mit einem Blick für das Ästhetische, wie sie sonst nur Kreationen der Modeschöpfer und ihre Modelle bekommen. (…) Beim Betrachten dieses Bildbandes begreifen wir, dass Schönheit auch eine Frage der Entfernung ist. (…) So mischt sich in die Bewunderung und Begeisterung beim Betrachten und Blättern in „Before They Pass Away“ Wut. Wut darüber, dass die Vernichtung zum Kontakt gehört. (…)

– Frankfurter Rundschau, D

(…) eine Serie künstlerisch hochwertiger Porträts vor zum Teil grandiosen Landschaften (…)

Die Letzten. (…) Jimmy Nelson besucht indigene Stämme aus aller Welt, um an unsere Wurzeln zu erinnern. Was für ein Panorama! Der Morgen hängt noch ganz frisch über dem dunstig-blauen Flusstal. Im Vordergrund drei stolze Männer in warmen Fellen auf Pferden, jeder mit einem Adler auf dem Arm. Sie gehören zum Stamm der Kasachen in der Mongolei. Das Jagen mit Hilfe der großen Raubvögel ist hier eine uralte Tradition. Diese prächtige Aufnahme stammt aus Jimmy Nelsons Mammutprojekt „Before They Pass Away“ – „Bevor sie aussterben“, eine Serie künstlerisch hochwertiger Porträts vor zum Teil grandiosen Landschaften. Viele der Völker, die der Fotograf besucht hat, kommen bis heute ohne Smartphones und andere moderne Bequemlichkeiten aus. Ihre Statussymbole sind ihr Körperschmuck, Jagdtrophäen und Waffen. Nelson war bei den Himba in Namibia, den Kalam in Papua-Neuguinea und den Gauchos in Argentinien. (…) Ihnen allen möchte Nelson ein Denmal setzen. (…)

– Stuttgarter Zeitung, D

(…) dieser Bildband ist ein einmaliges Werk von beeindruckender Schönheit, Ästhetik und fotografischer Kunst (…) Sehr empfehlenswert

Solche Volksstämme dürfen nicht aussterben! Der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat nach einem aufreibenden Leben als Bildreporter, als er den Kriegswirren, Gangs, Gewalt und Leid auf der Spur war, sich Stammeskulturen gewidmet, die weltweit verstreut, das Ursprüngliche des menschlichen Daseins verkörpern. Er hat dazu 31 Volksstämme aufgesucht, die in den entlegensten Winkeln auf unserem Planeten beheimatet sind, die noch wie ihre Urväter ihre Rituale, Sitten und Gebräuche pflegen und dabei bisher kaum von der Zivilisation korrumpiert worden sind. (…) Mit diesem außergewöhnlichen Bildband von Jimmy Nelson und dem teNeues Verlag soll dokumentiert werden, welcher kulturelle Verlust der Menschheit droht, wenn diesen Völkern ihre Identität genommen wird und wir ihnen ihre Lebensräume nehmen. (…) Abschließend ist zu notieren, dass dieser Bildband ein einmaliges Werk von beeindruckender Schönheit, Ästhetik und fotografischer Kunst ist, zudem aber auch einen hohen Informationswert besitzt. (…) Sehr empfehlenswert.

– www.amazon.de, D

(…) eine große leidenschaftliche Dokumentation der letzten indigenen Völker dieser Erde – Portraits (…) die den Stolz und die Pracht einzelner Stämme zeigen

(…) Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat bedrohte Völker besucht, die in unserer Google-Welt noch ihre uralten Bräuche bewahrt haben. Wir schauen in eine Vergangenheit, die vor unseren Zukunftsvisionen geschützt werden muss. (…) Jimmy Nelsons Anliegen ist es, durch seine Fotografie Stammeskulturen für die Nachwelt zu erhalten – auch wenn er den Wandel dadurch nicht aufhalten kann. Aber er möchte Bilder erschaffen, die uns und die nachfolgenden Generationen an die Schönheit des unverfälschten und authentischen Lebens erinnern. (…) hat Nelson über die letzten zwanzig Jahre Portraits geschaffen, die den Stolz und die Pracht einzelner Stämme zeigen. Bei diesem Projekt geht es aber um etwas viel Größeres: Wenn wir eine globale Bewegung anstoßen, die das Leben von Stämmen in Bildern, Gedanke und Geschichten dokumentiert, lässt sich ein Teil dieses kostbaren Kulturerbes der Welt vielleicht vor dem Untergang bewahren. (…)

– Traveller’s World, D

(…) Nelsons eindrucksvolle Porträts zeigen Menschen voll Stolz und Würde

Die letzten Vertreter ihrer Art. Sie heißen Himba, Huli oder Huaorani und gehören Naturvölkern an. Jimmy Nelson hat die Stammesvertreter der letzten indigenen Völker fotografiert. (…) Groß und schwer wiegt nicht nur das Buch, sondern auch das Projekt: Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat eine Bestandsaufnahme indigener Völker auf fünf Kontinenten gemacht. Für das epochale Werk „Before They Pass Away“ hat er bei 13 Reisen insgesamt 44 Länder besucht. Nelson ging es überhaupt nicht um eine klassische Fotoreportage, die die aktuelle Bedrohung mancher Ethnie dokumentieren soll. Seine Aufnahmen wollen Kunstwerke sein, in denen er uns eine inszenierte Welt zeigt, die eher in unseren Köpfen existiert und mit der realen Wirklichkeit weniger gemein hat. (…) Nelsons eindrucksvolle Porträts zeigen Menschen voll Stolz und Würde.

– www.stern.de, D

Auf mehr als 400 Seiten liegt uns die Welt zu Füßen. Eine Welt, völlig fremd und zugleich ungeheuer faszinierend.

Die Schönheit unserer Ursprünge. Drei kasachische Jäger halten im Sonnenaufgang ebenso stoisch wie stolz ihre Steinadler auf den Händen. Einige Seiten später taucht man in die Welt der Himba ein – rot bemalte Frauen und Männer, die durch die karge Landschaft im Südwesten Afrikas ziehen. Die Reise führt weiter von Papua-Neuguinea über die sibirische Halbinsel bis zu den Jägern im ecuadorianischen Amazonasbecken. Auf mehr als 400 Seiten liegt uns die Welt zu Füßen. Eine Welt, völlig fremd und zugleich ungeheuer faszinierend. Denn die 31 Kulturen, die der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson stellvertretend (…) ausgewählt hat, haben nur wenig mit unserer modernen Gesellschaft zu tun. Die Porträts zeigen stolze Erben jahrhundertealter Traditionen, denen es gelingt, in einer globalisierten Welt ihre überlieferten Bräuche aufrechtzuerhalten. (…)

– www.augenblicke.t-online.de, D

(…) epische Porträts von würdevollen Kriegern, eng verbundenen Familienclans und jahrhundertealten Kunstformen (…) Das ist ihm grandios gelungen

Magischer Moment. (…) Eine Welt die verschwinden wird. (…) zwei Jahre lang reiste der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson, 45, um die Welt, auf der Suche nach Stämmen und Völkern, die sich ihre ursprüngliche Lebensweise jenseits der Globalisierung erhalten haben. Er ritt mit den Kasachen durch die Täler der westlichen Mongolei, bewunderte die Masken der Asaro im Hochland Papua-Neuguineas und begleitete die Tschuktschen durch ihre eiskalte Heimat in der baumlosen Tundra. 27 Stämme hat er für den im teNeues Verlag erschienenen Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ vor seiner Laufboden-Großformatkamera inszeniert. Entstanden sind epische Porträts von würdevollen Kriegern, eng verbundenen Familienclans und jahrhundertealten Kunstformen. „Ich wollte unersetzliche ethnografische Aufzeichnungen einer Welt schaffen, die bald verschwinden wird“, sagt Nelson. Das ist ihm grandios gelungen.

– Focus, D

Dokumentation und Memento (…) In seinem außergewöhnlichen Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ zeigt der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson die letzten verbliebenen Völker (…)

Es existiert noch: das pure menschliche Leben jenseits unserer globalisierten Welt. Naturvölker und Stämme, die über Jahrhunderte geprägte Bräuche und Traditionen in Würde weiterführen und leben. In seinem außergewöhnlichen Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ zeigt der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson die letzten verbleibenden Völker und ihre Lebensweisen. Er machte sie jenseits der Zivilisation in Wüstengegenden, im Dschungel oder in den Bergen und den Regenwäldern ausfindig. Er saß mit ihnen zusammen und sprach mit ihnen, bevor sie sich der Kamera stellten. Herausgekommen ist fotografisch festgehaltenes Leben in all ihrer Schönheit und Echtheit: die Welt muss sich auf die Ursprünge besinnen.

– Quality, D

Schönheit und Würde (…) Ein Denkmal gegen das Vergessen

Schon als junger Mann träumte Jimmy Nelson davon, einen letzten Blick auf die Völker werfen zu dürfen, deren Kulturen im Verschwinden begriffen sind. (…) Sie leben in der kalten Wüste Ladakhs, im Hochland Papua-Neuguineas oder am Kunene-Fluss im Nordwesten Namibias. (…) Gemeinsam ist den 31 Volksgruppen und abgeschieden lebenden Volksstämmen, die Jimmy Nelson für dieses Buch fotografiert und porträtiert hat, dass ihre Kultur vom Aussterben bedroht ist. (…) Entstanden sind Fotos von großer Schönheit. (…) Schönheit und Würde seiner Modelle zu zeigen, auch darum ging es Jimmy Nelson. Und das ist ihm tatsächlich gelungen. Alle Porträtierten erschienen wie Könige in ihrem eigenen, für Außenstehende unbegreiflichen, geheimnisvollen Reich.

– buchjournal, D

Mammutwerk (…) In 402 wunderschönen Farbfotografien zeigt Jimmy Nelson das Leben von 27 Völkern, die es in Zeiten der Globalisierung schlaffen, ihrem Kulturerbe treu zu bleiben (…)

Im Bildband “Before They Pass Away” porträtiert Jimmy Nelson die letzten Naturvölker der Welt. Mit über 400 Seiten und einem Gewicht von 5,5 Kilo (!) entspricht das Mammutwerk eher einem Denkmal mit Durchschlagskraft als einem Bildband. Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson reiste innerhalb von zwei Jahren zu 27 Urvölkern der Welt, um Kulturen, die vom Aussterben bedroht sind, fotografisch festzuhalten. (…) Mit seinen Bildern kann der 46-jährige diese Entwicklung zwar nicht aufhalten, aber ein Mahnmal gegen das Vergessen von Kulturen wie den Ladakhi in Indien, den Tibetern oder den Kasachen in der Mongolei setzen. Nelson will die Einzigartigkeit einer Welt zeigen, deren Werte durch Solidarität, Ehrlichkeit und Mitmenschlichkeit getragen werden. (…)

– lonely planet traveller, D

(…) Den letzen indigenen Völker setzt er ein stilistisch einmaliges Denk-, der Öffentlichkeit ein Mahnmal derer gefährdeten Existenz (…)

(…) Der britische Fotograf hat auf der ganzen Welt bedrohte Völker besucht, die in einer globalisierten Welt ihre uralten Bräuche bewahrt haben. Dafür war Nelson in über 40 Ländern unterwegs, unter anderem in Äthiopien, Tansania und Kenia, in China und Nepal, in Sibirien und der Mongolei. Das einzigartige visuelle Resultat seiner Arbeit mit einer über 50 Jahre alten Plattenkamera mündete schließlich in seiner Serie „Before They Pass Away“. Jimmy Nelson möchte damit ein Bewusstsein für die faszinierende Vielfalt der kultur-, und geschichtsträchtigen Symbole dieser Völker schaffen und Zeugenschaft über deren Riten, Bräuche und Traditionen ablegen. Den letzen indigenen Völkern setzt er ein stilistisch einmaliges Denk-, der Öffentlichkeit ein Mahnmal derer gefährdeten Existenz. (…)

– NaturFoto, D

Faszinierender Bildband. Denkmal für die bedrohten Völker der Welt.

Zweieinhalb Jahre reiste der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson in die entlegensten Winkel der Welt. Er suchte Völkerstämme, die vom Aussterben bedroht sind – und fand sie! In Afrika, Nepal, Neuseeland, Papua-Neuguinea. Er besuchte Mursi, Maori, Kasachen, Massai, und 31 andere Stämme, die ihre uralten Traditionen bewahren. Und er lichtete sie in ihrer ganzen Würde ab. Im faszinierenden Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ (…) hat Nelson ihnen ein Denkmal gesetzt.

– Bild, D

Hüter der Kultur (…) Fotograf Jimmy Nelson porträtiert Stammeskulturen aus aller Welt (…)

Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson porträtiert Stammeskulturen aus aller Welt, die ihr Erbe und ihre Rituale in der Globalisierung – noch – behalten haben. (…) Jimmy Nelson sagt über sich, er sei kein Wissenschaftler, sondern Idealist und Ästhet. Seinen Fotos sieht man an, dass er eine Beziehung zu den Menschen aufgebaut hat, die er porträtiert. (…) Von dem Fotoband gibt es eine Collector’s Edition XXL in limitierter Ausgabe mit signierten Fotoprints. (…)

– Handelsblatt, D

(..) Die großformatigen Bilder beschwören die ursprüngliche Kraft einer bedrohten Welt (…)

Vor dem Hintergrund einzigartiger Landschaften hat Jimmy Nelson Menschen aus bedrohten Stammeskulturen porträtiert. Zwei Jahre lang war er in entferntesten Winkeln dieser Erde unterwegs, um das Leben dieser Menschen, die unzertrennbar mit der meist rauen Natur verbunden sind, zu dokumentieren. Die großformatigen Bilder beschwören die ursprüngliche Kraft einer bedrohten Welt, die nur noch außer Sichtweite der Zivilisation bestehen kann.

– missio magazin, D

Der Biograf der Stammesvölker. (…)

Mit einer klobigen Großbildkamera zog Jimmy Nelson in die entlegensten Gegenden der Erde – um das Leben bedrohter Völker für die Nachwelt zu bewahren (…). „Die Fotos, die ich mache, sollen den Betrachter emotional treffen. Je kraftvoller und schöner die Umgebung ist, je besser die Fotos komponiert sind, umso mehr Menschen sind von Ihnen fasziniert – und so schauen sie auch auf die Thematik. Das war mir ein sehr großes Anliegen. (…).

– www.geo.de, D

Stolze Zeugen einer vergessenen Welt (…) ein Buch mit faszinierenden Bildern.

Jimmy Nelson rückt Naturvölker ins beste Licht (…) „Romantisch aber wahr“ der Engländer Jimmy Nelson reiste durch die Welt und fotografierte Menschen naturverbundener Stämme, um sie „in Stolz und Würde“ zu zeigen, solange sie noch ihr traditionelles Leben führen. (…) Entstanden ist ein Buch mit faszinierenden Bildern. (…) „Ich will die Menschen als Ikonen zeigen. Es geht mir um die Einzigartigkeit dieser Völker, um ihre Schönheit und ihre Bräuche.“ (…)

– Beobachter, CH

(…) fantastische Aufnahmen (…) Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat entlegene Völker bereist (…) sein Buch (…) ist gleichzeitig Archiv und Mahnung

Gefährdeter Reichtum der Menschheit. Der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson hat entlegene Völker bereist und in fantastischen Aufnahmen verewigt – sein Buch (…) ist gleichzeitig Archiv und Mahnung. Bevor sie verschwunden sind oder von der Moderne aufgesogen werden, hat Fotograf Jimmy Nelson Naturvölker auf vier Kontinenten fotografiert. Nun hat er sein Projekt als Buch veröffentlicht. (…)

– Abendzeitung, D

(…) Grandiose Bilder einsamer Stämme

Für diese Fotos hat Jimmy Nelson zwei Jahre bei Menschen verbracht, die in völliger Abgeschiedenheit leben: bei 31 Stämmen u.a. in Papua-Neuguinea und der Mongolei durfte er stiller Gast sein, sich mit ihren Regeln und Ritualen vertraut machen. Einzigartige Aufnahmen hat er mit seiner Kamera eingefangen – und jetzt als opulentes Buch im Verlag teNeues herausgebracht. (…)

– Buchvorstellung in München in tz, D

Geldanlage mit Kunst-Appeal

Ein Buch im Haus kann niemals schaden. Es ist gut fürs Prestige und kann den Besitzer sogar ein bisschen reicher machen, falls es im Wert steigt. (…) Bei teNeues präsentiert der britische Fotograf Jimmy Nelson seine Dokumentation der letzten indigenen Völker der Erde. (…) „Before They Pass Away“ enthält 500 Farbfotos, je drei handsignierte Fotoprints und ist für 6500 Euro zu haben. Der Buchständer ist in diesem Fall aus Plexiglas. (…) Mit Sammleraugen betrachtet, fallen die Preise übrigens moderat aus. Einzelne Prints wären in Galerien nicht unter 1500 bis 2500 Euro zu haben. (…)

– manager magazin, D

Der Reiz dieser Bilder liegt nicht nur in ihrer technischen Brillanz, sonder oft auch in ihren Inszenierungen, die wohl auf den Fotografen genauso wie auf die Fotografierten zurückgehen.

Der Engländer Jimmy Nelson (…) fotografiert seit vielen Jahren Angehörige kleiner Volksgruppen in entlegenen Weltgegenden. (…) Der Reiz dieser Bilder liegt nicht nur in ihrer technischen Brillanz, sonder oft auch in ihren Inszenierungen, die wohl auf den Fotografen genauso wie auf die Fotografierten zurückgehen. Kein Text erläutert Szenarien und die nicht selten prächtigen, für europäische Augen ausgefallenen Accessoires der Dargestellten. Auf die Wirkung der Bilder allein wird gesetzt: auf die Landschaften, Aufmachung, Gesten und Gesichter. Man darf vermuten, dass dabei die indigenen, tradierten Elemente bewusst in den Vordergrund gerückt sind, während die unumgänglichen Produkte der globalen Ökonomie nur an den Rändern hervorblitzen. (…) Es ist ein Spiel der Selbstdarstellung, an dem offenbar beiden Seiten Gefallen fanden – und das seine Wirkung auf den Betrachter nicht verfehlt.

– FAZ, D

Bildband des Monats (…) Stolz und archaisch anmutende Naturvölker posen vor der Großbildkamera Jimmy Nelsons (…)

Die Welt ist schön hier: Stolz und archaisch anmutende Naturvölker posen vor der Großbildkamera Jimmy Nelsons, als wäre die Welt um sie herum intakt und erdig und gut. Und manchmal scheint sie das tatsächlich zu sein. In Stammeskluft stehen sie also hier; maskiert, geschminkt, bisweilen bewaffnet, wie aus einer anderen Zeit zu uns gebeamt. Bei all dem durchaus gekünstelten Posing in atemberaubender Natur nimmt man Nelsons Portraits – im Unterschied etwa zu Salgados Sakral-Fotomasche – diesen dramatischen Gestus im Sunset ab. Steht hier doch stets die Würde vor Voyeurismus und der Gier auf tolle Bilder.

– fotoMAGAZIN, D

Biograf der Völker (…)

Bemalte Gesichter und Körper, Fest- und Jagtrituale, aber auch stille Alltagszenen indigener Völker zeigt der Brite Jimmy Nelson, ein ehemaliger Werbefotograf, in seinem Bildband „Before They Pass Away“ (…). Für sein Projekt reiste er zu mehr als 30 Stämmen, unter anderem nach Afrika, Papua-Neuguinea, Nepal und in die Südsee, im Gepäck eine Großbildkamera. Die detailreichen Aufnahmen sind sowohl ethnologische Studien als auch Kritik an einer globalisierten Welt, die immer weniger Platz zu haben scheint für Kulturen, die seit Jahrtausenden im Einklang mit der Natur leben. (…)

– GEO SAISON, D

(…) kraftvolle Bilder, ikonenhaft schön (…)

Ikonen des Untergangs. Es gibt drei Dinge, die Jimmy Nelson bestens vertraut sind: Mobbing, radikale Veränderung und Isolation. Drei persönliche Erfahrungen, die den britischen Werbefotografen dazu geführt haben sollen, den untergehenden Kulturen dieser Welt ein Denkmal zu setzen. (…) Nelson fühlt sich angezogen vom Fremden, macht sich auf die Suche nach den letzten isoliert lebenden Völkern dieser Welt und stilisiert sie zu Models, wie man sie aus Hochglanz-Magazinen kennt. Es sind kraftvolle Bilder, ikonenhaft schön. Alles bis ins Detail meisterhaft vor atemberaubenden Landschaften arrangiert. (…)

– natur, D

Von stolzen Menschen und bedrohten Kulturen (…) Ein spektakuläres Buch

In Zeiten der Globalisierung sind Stammeskulturen (…) bedroht. Jimmy Nelson hat sich mit seiner Großformatkamera auf eine Weltreise begeben, um ursprünglich lebende Menschen in abgelegenen Winkeln der Erde zu fotografieren. (…) Man spürt, dass er sich Zeit genommen hat, den Menschen nah gekommen ist. In ihrer traditionellen Kleidung strahlen sie Stolz, Selbstbewusstsein und Würde aus. Berauschend schöne Bilderzeigen auch ihr Leben im Einklang mit der Natur. Ein spektakuläres Buch.

– Neue Westfälische, D

(…) eine Huldigung an die vergessenen Völker dieser Erde.

Stolz und Schön. Sie leben wie vor Tausenden von Jahren. Bewahren seit Generationen ihre Traditionen. Doch die Urvölker der Erde sind bedroht. Mit ihnen würde die Menschheit eine ihrer kostbarsten Tugenden verlieren: die eigene Unschuld. (…) Er musste singen, tanzen und schreien – aber er schloss auch ganz wortlos Freundschaften: Auf der Suche nach den Ursprüngen der Menschheit besuchte Jimmy Nelson 31 Stämme, die in völliger Abgeschiedenheit leben. Dafür reisten der britische Fotograf und sein Assistent zweieinhalb Jahre um die Welt, immer die Kameras auf dem Rücken. Entstanden ist eine Huldigung an die vergessenen Völker dieser Erde.

– VIEW, D

(…) ein großformatiger Bildband von außergewöhnlicher Ästhetik, epische Bilddokumente, gemalte Seelen (…)

Jimmy Nelson hatte als junger Mann einen Traum: fasziniert vom amerikanischen Ethnologen und Fotografen Edward Sheriff Curtis (…) wollte er eines Tages die untergehenden Stammeskulturen dieser Erde aufsuchen und für die Nachwelt fotografisch festhalten. Mit seiner Kamera drang er in den Lebensraum von Jägern und Sammlern und setzte sie vor atemberaubenden Naturkulissen in Szene. (…) Entstanden sind ein großformatiger Bildband von außergewöhnlicher Ästhetik, epische Bilddokumente, gemalte Seelen. Der Band zeigt uns, wie wir lebten, bevor wir wurden, was wir heute sind.

– Basler Zeitung, CH

Ein absolutes Muss für jeden Fotografen und ein Erinnerungsstück an die Vergangenheit für kommende Generationen.

Unsere Welt befindet sich im Wandel. Natur und alte Kulturen passen nicht mehr in unseren modernen Alltag. Bevor die letzten Spuren der Vergangenheit verwischt sind, macht sich der Fotograf Jimmy Nelson auf die Reise zu den Urvölkern dieser Welt. Auf seiner Liste sind die Maori, die Urvölker von Namibia, Tibet und Pakistan. Beeindruckende Porträts, unglaubliche Farben und Stimmungen vermischen sich in diesem Buch. Trotz der Faszination kommt eine gewisse Beklommenheit beim Gedanken auf, dass diese Völker bald keinen Platz mehr bei uns finden. Ein absolutes Muss für jeden Fotografen und ein Erinnerungsstück an die Vergangenheit für kommende Generationen.

– lounge, CH

Related Posts